Student Improvement

Mind Designs are the Roadmaps to Writing Success!

4148522With the summer travel season in full swing, one of the most important items to pack for a road trip is a map.  Whether it’s a paper map or a GPS device, having a plan to reach a destination makes it easier to get there.  Without an accurate map, travelers might struggle to find their way. Whether they have to stop and retrace their route because they realize they are headed in the wrong direction or, even worse, they end up in a different place than they intended, when there’s a destination but no map to get there, road trips become torturous. Planning the route saves time and frustration and ensures travelers get to their intended destination!

Recently, I scored a batch of writing from three classes that illustrated the impact the “roadmaps” in Writing with Design has on the quality of student writing.  What struck me about the classes I analyzed was how much scores improved when students use the Mind Designs, the road maps, to plan their writing.

In two of the classes, I noticed that the writing was unfocused.  Their scores reflected this.  I could see that students struggled to get their ideas on the page because they had no plan. They were lost on their route and many ended up in destinations that were confusing and way off track.  In the third class, student scores were significantly higher.  As I scored this class, I noticed that students were using a Sequence Design to plan their narratives.  Clearly, the teacher had taught students how to use the Design to effectively organize, or map out, their writing.  Their writing was focused, well structured, and on prompt.  Good planning also freed students to be more creative and add more details.

As an independent Writing Analyst for Writing with Design, I can attest to this: Mind Designs give students a roadmap to success in writing!

-Angela
Writing Analyst for Writing with Design

Just How Far We’ve Come

2023999Before spring break, several of my 2nd grade students came up to me and asked for paper to take home. My first thought was that it was so they could draw pictures and color. “No, Mrs. Plescher, we want to write!” Isabella informed me.

In that moment, I felt as though one of my year’s goals had been accomplished. I set out the year, using Writing with Design, to empower my students to be confident, eager writers. Realizing they wanted to spend time over their break thinking and writing showed me just how far they had come since September. The same students who rushed through writing, who were resistant to writing more than two sentences, who often said, “I don’t have anything else to write about,” now had the motivation, desire, and pride to write independently.

Writing is now an integral part of our classroom culture. As a teacher, I used to think, “What can I possibly write about this week?” Now, my students and I often say, “Oooh! Let’s write about that!” several times during each day. From working on sophisticated words to creative titles to strong endings, we have all come so far with writing this year!

 

 

 

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